#GoNorthEast

GoNorthEast aims to celebrate the significance and scale of the Aberdeen Western Peripheral Route / Balmedie to Tipperty (AWPR/B-T) and what it will mean for everyone in the region and beyond.

The campaign seeks to engage with communities around the north east as we look forward to this transformational project being fully completed later this year.

It’s worth pointing out that although initially envisaged as a peripheral route, the AWPR/B-T is in fact a major artery that will breathe new life into the city and the wider region. It is about connectivity, both within and outwith the region. It’s about improving our quality and way of life and enhancing our ability to do business by better connecting our city with its surroundings, our communities and our public transport system.

The main benefits of the route have been captured under the themes of economy, safety and sustainability.

The Road

One of the largest infrastructure projects in Europe, the new route will span 36 miles (58km) of the north east of Scotland. That’s the equivalent of building a new road between Edinburgh and Glasgow in just four years!

This truly amazing infrastructure project also includes: 25 miles (40km) of new side roads; 19 miles (30km) of access track; 12 junctions; two river major crossings – at Dee and Don; a bridge for the Aberdeen to Inverness Railway; and three wildlife bridges; with more than 100 other structures also built for local road traffic and pedestrians.

The road features four sections:

  • North Kingswells to Blackdog – 10 miles (16.1km)
  • Charleston to North Kingswells – 12 miles (18.7km)
  • Stonehaven to Cleanhill – 7 miles (11.5km)
  • Blackdog to Tipperty – 7 miles (12km)

Your Journey

Anticipation is growing among drivers and communities ahead of the long-awaited opening of the AWPR/B-T, and you may be wondering how the road will impact you, your journeys, and how to best prepare for the opening.

Wherever you’re travelling in and around Aberdeen, you’ll find your journey time is likely to be reduced when the new road opens.


History

A peripheral route around Aberdeen was considered as early as the 1950s, with potential routes discussed in the 1970s and 1980s when traffic was steadily increasing in the city due to the oil boom however, serious planning for the new road didn’t begin until the 1990s.

Click below to discover the project’s key milestones and other important historic dates for the north east and beyond.



If you’re interested in the construction project and the various supporting documents please visit Transport Scotland’s project page

News about the APWR/B-T

AWPR ‘GoNorthEast’ campaign launched in run-up to completion
Plans for how the North East will celebrate the opening of the most eagerly anticipated...
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